Saturday, 24 April 2010

The 'Indian' Omlette

Upbringing speaks. For instance, I can never stomach the omlettes made by the sweetheart, even when he makes puppy eyes and promises to add extra love. It's sweet, and makes him extra endearing, but his medium-rare omelette (as it were) no more palatable. I was brought up to eat my eggs well-cooked, and with different kinds of stuff in them. So, here's my recipe for the regular omlettes made in most non-vegetarian Indian homes, preceded by his, which is an instant hit with everyone but me :-(

First, his is high on proteins, carbs, and even just in the number of ingredients. He uses:
Two eggs, at least.
Cheddar or processed cheese, cut in slices.
Ham ends, cut or torn in shreds.
Leftover deli meats, diced.
Tomatoes, diced.
Parsley, chopped.
Scallions, chopped.
Onions (optional)
Milk (optional)
Oregano, a dash.
Salt, pepper.
Ground mozarella.
Bacon fat or oil.

His way is to beat the two eggs thoroughly with salt, pepper, and a handful of chopped parsley (and with milk, if using). When they're a nice, yellow, slightly frothy mixture, he heats oil in a pan/skillet, and when the oil is hot, pours the eggs on it and tilts the pan so the egg spreads all over it in a nice circle. Now, down the middle, he arranges the meat, tomatoes, cheese and chopped onions. The oregano is sprinkled on the top. He let's it cook for a while, while he washes up the whisking bowl and sets places at the table. Then he sprinkles the mozarella in a swirl over the omeletter and folds it into half, spreading out the little heap of goodies and sealing it in between two layers of egg. He let's the side on the pan's surface cook for half a minute, then flips and let's the other side cook till the minute is over. Then he gobbles it up.













My Way:

I use: one egg per person. Red onion, chopped. Green chillies, chopped. Salt, pepper. Butter or sunflower oil.

I beat an egg with a pinch of salt. When the egg is fluffy, I add chopped red onions and green chillies (without the seeds, because omlettes are no fun super hot) and whisk some more. I heat some oil or butter (about a tablespoon) in a skillet or frying pan. When a drop of egg sizzles, I pour the whole batter and spread it out. It makes a much smaller circle, lacking the body provided by an extra egg and milk. I let it cook for while, then I fold it in half (sometimes I'll put slices of cheese and maybe some diced tomatoes before folding, but not often). I cook both sides till a fork speared into the omlette comes out clean, and the egg is not soft and cuddly, but firm and brownish-golden. I eat it with a piece of hot buttered toast.





2 comments:

Sumit said...

while I do it both ways, I prefer using Maggi Hot & Sweet sauce than using chillies. With a warm cup of tea/coffee and fresh, hot buttered toast - its the second best breakfast after luchi - torkari :)

Dhruva said...

The latter is called Maamlet.:D